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  1. #1
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    Dialing it in... Advice Needed on Set Up

    2005 TR-196, 200 Optimax on an 8" manual jack plate, Tempest Plus 26

    After doing some motor work and getting it out on the water here's where I am. Note: all speeds are GPS, holeshot was only decent at either height, full load with 2 guys and ~25 gal of fuel

    First time out with original set up as I got it... 1.5" below pad, tempest plus 26, felt "squirrelly" the wole time and chine walk was severe at 58mph @ 4900 rpm (went no further)

    Second time out... moved to a starting point of 3" below pad, same prop, mild / severe chine at 62 @ 5200 rpm (went no further), Steering had a better feel, H2O 25psi

    Based on RPM there's still a lot to get out of it. I backed off after chinewalk was bad enough to make this experienced driver tighten up.

    Should I go down to a tempest plus 25?
    Suggested height?

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  3. Member
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    #2
    Not the easiest combo to set up. And you will chine walk at the top speeds. So you will need to learn to drive. And the 1st part is balance. Put a level across your deck while in the water, how you will normally run the boat. Move weight around until it sits level left to right. also move heavy items to the rear. This alone makes the chine much easier to learn to drive. Also, 4 blade props walk less, and the higher the motor, usually the less tendency to chine walk. But you must first be balanced. Then take the next steps.

  4. Member Bassnailer's Avatar
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    #3
    What model boat do you have? Also, do you have hydraulic or cable steering? I had a similar issue when I repowered my Stratos with a 200 EFI. Boat was scary to drive over 60 mph. I did some research and found a couple of tips which completely eliminated my chine walk. First, I followed the advice of John Tiger Jr in this article and adjusted my steering so there is no slack. http://www.bassboatexchange.com/tuning-out-chine-walk Next, I pumped all the grease zerts on the outboard full of marine grease to keep the outboard tight. Finally, I made a torque tab out of JB Weld Steel Stick to help control the prop torque of my 25p Tempest+. I did all these modifications before going back to the lake, and chine walk was gone, and boat was tight as fast as I could get it to go.

  5. Member
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    #4
    You want to set the 26" tempest prop at 2.5" under pad. The higher you can run it the less it will walk but 1.5" is too high. Like John said balance the load keep all the heavy stuff in the rear and if you can find someone to show you how to drive it and handle the chine walk.

  6. Member Jason Hale's Avatar
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    #5
    What part of KY are you in? I’m in northern Tn and have my second TR-196 and would be glad to help you with set up or getting the feel of driving it.

  7. Member
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    #6
    John Jackson / Bassnailer.... I have now balanced equipment the best I can by using a scale, and taking into account I could be solo or with a partner I now have all my plastics in storage containers that can easily be moved from rear port or starboard storage. I also have moved my weight items (bullet sinkers, weighted hooks, etc.) to the back. After reading the article I checked my steering (sea star hydraulic) and from what I can tell the only thing I could tighten was the nuts going through the motor steering bracket. If there is something else to adjust let me know.

    Mdtritn21... I figured 1.5" was too high. I moved it from 3" up to 2.75" and will give it a shot. Not that I don't believe you I just don't want to make too many changes and then not be able to tell which one made the difference.

    Jason... If I was a little closer I'd definitely take you up on that. I'm just north of Lexington. As of right now the soonest I'd get close to you is July at Cedar Creek Lake and then late September for Dale Hallow. What's your set up? height, prop, etc.

  8. Member Jason Hale's Avatar
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    #7
    I have a hydraulic plate so I can adjust depending on load. Loaded I typically run around 2.5 below and turn a 26 B&B’d Tempest in summer and 27 in cooler months. With just me and load I run close to 2 below. Run 72-74 loaded depending on season and 74-77 light.

    I’m just south of Dale Hollow and would be glad to come meet you in September if you want.

  9. Member
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    #8
    Take Jason up on his help. Nothing like someone with experience on the same boat to get it right.
    Also, you can't balance it with a scale. It's not just the weight, but the placement of the weight. Weight places closer to the outside edges makes more difference than weight closer to the center. You have to use a level on the water. And you can't balance it well for one and two persons, unless you have a center console. (Did you also weight your batteries, oil tank, electronics, etc.)
    Last edited by John Jackson; 06-21-2018 at 04:31 AM.

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    #9
    You need to listen to John Jackson......level the boat with you sitting in it on the water. Not only will boat drive better its safer if something goes wrong.

  11. Member
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by John Jackson View Post
    Not the easiest combo to set up. And you will chine walk at the top speeds. So you will need to learn to drive. And the 1st part is balance. Put a level across your deck while in the water, how you will normally run the boat. Move weight around until it sits level left to right. also move heavy items to the rear. This alone makes the chine much easier to learn to drive. Also, 4 blade props walk less, and the higher the motor, usually the less tendency to chine walk. But you must first be balanced. Then take the next steps.
    In order to get chine walk to a minimum Bass boats need a lot more weight on the right side, at least 100 lbs more, leveling at rest will make it worse in all case unless you are running a counter rotation prop. I have owned Skeeters, champions and basscats and every one them had almost no chine walk or none at all. My current Cougar likes about 150 lbs more on the right side. That is just about how much larger my son is than me. When he drives we load both fuel tanks equal, If I am by myself I fill the right tank only. Drives like crap when not balanced this way. Needs the right side weight addition to counter the prop rotation that is trying to rotate the boat off of the pad to the left. Very few boater are aware of this.

    Most also believe they need full trim up to run the fastest, in most cases that is also false. When you get the right prop and the right P to P , Usually you will run faster with less than full trim as well as less walk. You know when you getting close as the speed comes and rooster tail is long and low. A lot of power is wasted in lifting the nose that can be used for forward thrust. Must have the prop right to do this. I have yet to get a new out of the box prop that was anywhere close to being right

    Try it, I am confident you will see very positive results
    Last edited by lpugh; 06-29-2018 at 12:22 AM.
    Thank You Leon Pugh
    leon.pugh@comcast.net

  12. Member
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    #11
    150 more weight in a performance hull will make one nearly undrivable. And a Triton is a pretty good performance hull. But what do I know. I've only set up a few dozen boats and run 90's with a full tourney load and a slow prop.

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    #12
    Bass boats don't chine walk . Bass boat drivers let them chine walk . I don't care how you set them up the driver has to keep it balanced up on the pad .

  14. Member
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    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by skennedy View Post
    Bass boats don't chine walk . Bass boat drivers let them chine walk . I don't care how you set them up the driver has to keep it balanced up on the pad .
    I don't have to unless trimmed to high to get another .5 mph out of it. Even then it is minor. The same with other bass boats I have owned. Correctly set up as I stated above and chine walk is not a problem even with a total amateur driver. I do agree early Tritons are much more difficult to overcome though

    John: Rick Pierce acknowledged this a while back on the bass cat forum when I posted it there. http://www.bbcboards.net/showthread.php?t=905619&p=9382503&highlight=#post9382503
    Simple physics of overcoming the prop trying to rotate the boat counter clockwise. Not only will it help reduce chine walk it will also give you just little more speed, On my Cougar about 1 mph more
    Last edited by lpugh; 06-29-2018 at 02:58 PM.
    Thank You Leon Pugh
    leon.pugh@comcast.net