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  1. #1
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    what are the advantages of Dooley trucks?

    and the disadvantages besides having 6 tires on one vehicle to replace?

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  3. Member Bass AHolic's Avatar
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    #2
    Advantage is if hauling HEAVY loads, disadvantages wont fit in normal size garage door widths , avg parking spaces , down town etc. add extra length, at banks on main streets lolo. have mud flaps on rear as it doubles the debris thrown from tires . and cant go thru drive thru car washes. and some drive thru's for fast food etc...

  4. Moderator adchunts's Avatar
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    #3
    Dual wheels really help control large trailers. The bigger trailers can push the tow vehicle around some. Another set of tires on the back gives the tow vehicle some additional assistance in that area. Guys I know that have towed the same trailer with a single wheel versus dual wheel have told me there is a substantial difference.
    Aaron Campbell
    New Braunfels, Texas
    2007 Bass Cat Sabre
    2011 Merc 175 Pro XS

  5. Member
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    #4
    Most people can tow what they want with a SRW (single rear wheel) 3/4 ton or 1 ton truck. The problem is with tongue weight on the hitch.

    Most 3/4 ton trucks only handle 2500 lbs. in the bed or on the hitches. Duallies will handle over 4K lbs. most of the time. I have a fifth wheel trailer with a 2K lb. kingpin weight, and my 3/4 ton diesel is max'd out. I cannot tow a full size fifth wheel or a toy hauler RV because I don't have the weight carrying capabilities.

    Other benefits of duallies is if you blow a tire on the rear, you have a backup. And if you have a trailer tire blow, you can stop the rig better--more stability.

    Remember that bumper hitches need 10-15% of the total trailer weight on the hitch. But a fifth wheel or goose neck trailer requires 20-25% of total weight on the hitch.

    I tow a 24' boat behind my 3/4 ton that's relatively light. But the trailer length and poor aerodynamics of my boat make it pull substantially harder than it actually weights. Bass boats don't need such vehicles, thank goodness.

  6. Member
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
    Most people can tow what they want with a SRW (single rear wheel) 3/4 ton or 1 ton truck. The problem is with tongue weight on the hitch.

    Most 3/4 ton trucks only handle 2500 lbs. in the bed or on the hitches. Duallies will handle over 4K lbs. most of the time. I have a fifth wheel trailer with a 2K lb. kingpin weight, and my 3/4 ton diesel is max'd out. I cannot tow a full size fifth wheel or a toy hauler RV because I don't have the weight carrying capabilities.

    Other benefits of duallies is if you blow a tire on the rear, you have a backup. And if you have a trailer tire blow, you can stop the rig better--more stability.

    Remember that bumper hitches need 10-15% of the total trailer weight on the hitch. But a fifth wheel or goose neck trailer requires 20-25% of total weight on the hitch.

    I tow a 24' boat behind my 3/4 ton that's relatively light. But the trailer length and poor aerodynamics of my boat make it pull substantially harder than it actually weights. Bass boats don't need such vehicles, thank goodness.
    That's weird, because my 3/4 ton handles 4,000# quite well. My pin weight is 3,500+ and handles it well too..........



  7. Member
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by transamz9 View Post
    That's weird, because my 3/4 ton handles 4,000# quite well. My pin weight is 3,500+ and handles it well too..........
    Modern diesel powered trucks have the horsepower and torque to pull very heavy weights. They just don't all have the weight carrying abilities, handling or brakes to stop such heavy loads safely. Have a major wreck substantially overloaded, and many insurance companies will deny any claims.

    No single rear wheel truck is within specs within those weights. You really should read about your manufacturers' weight specifications online. They're somewhat difficult to understand, however. It never hurts to go to a truck stop and put your rig on a certified scale to see where you stand.

  8. Member
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    #7
    Disadvantage to duels is fuel milage, more tires rotating burns more fuel, more surface area bulging out takes more fuel.

  9. Member
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    #8
    great information here I never thought gas vs diesel

  10. #9
    We had a SRW F350 and went to a DRW F350 on my farm. Same engine. Same model year (2015) Night and day difference hauling heavy loads...especially when braking.
    Light loads that I pull with my Tundra like my Triton dont make that much of a difference handling wise. In fact most of the time we use either my 2017 Tundra or my wife's 2016 Ram EcoDiesel.

    The debate for gas vs diesel will go on until we run out of petroleum. Both have their pros/cons.

  11. Member
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
    Modern diesel powered trucks have the horsepower and torque to pull very heavy weights. They just don't all have the weight carrying abilities, handling or brakes to stop such heavy loads safely. Have a major wreck substantially overloaded, and many insurance companies will deny any claims.

    No single rear wheel truck is within specs within those weights. You really should read about your manufacturers' weight specifications online. They're somewhat difficult to understand, however. It never hurts to go to a truck stop and put your rig on a certified scale to see where you stand.
    I know where i stand with my weights and capacities. Its not hard to understand the capacities. One either goes by what the OEM's lawyers put on the little sticker to cover their butts or go by the actual capacities of the truck itself. Then you have the legal axle limits after that the law says you can run down the road with.



  12. Member
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jocephus View Post
    We had a SRW F350 and went to a DRW F350 on my farm. Same engine. Same model year (2015) Night and day difference hauling heavy loads...especially when braking.
    Light loads that I pull with my Tundra like my Triton dont make that much of a difference handling wise. In fact most of the time we use either my 2017 Tundra or my wife's 2016 Ram EcoDiesel.

    The debate for gas vs diesel will go on until we run out of petroleum. Both have their pros/cons.
    Unless you are running through an obstacle course running in and around corners doing a panic stop then your 2 trucks have the same brakes. The only difference is the rear suspension. The two trucks will stop the load the same. I try not to run obstacle courses while im stopping.



  13. Member
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    #12
    Just put 6 new tires on my Dually, the cost actually wasn't a full 2 tires more because the 235 tires are cheaper than the 285s that are put on the SRW trucks.

    When I got the brakes done there was some extra bearings or seals that it needed that were added to the price.

    The MTO sticker is the thing that I really hate about driving a dually. The yearly safety seems to be a chance for the dealer to find something I have to get fixed.