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  1. #1
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    Putting on aerated greens

    When playing on aerated greens do you allow yourself a guarantee 2 putt or do you play until it drops? I ended up going out yesterday and would have shot an even 36 on the front with 2 putts or less. I had two holes that I missed he second putt on and would have shot 38. Either way, it was a great round for me.
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  3. Member haha's Avatar
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    #2
    Playing on recently aerated greens (playing within the week of aeration) are more of a "practice" round for me. I hit multiple shots, putts, take gimmes etc. I don't go out and try to score well or care about the score.
    Ive been on way too many courses where the aeration is horrible. They punch holes and don't sand fill or they cover the whole green in sand or they don't sand enough.
    More of the higher priced courses aerate much better. Some are using a smaller tine to punch the greens which makes the green heal quicker and doesn't effect the roll of the ball all that much.
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    #3
    I try to "lag" putt more on aerated greens. Even a 15' putt I try not to get too aggressive. The last thing I want is a 3 footer coming back!!!

  5. Member vausoner's Avatar
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    #4
    We played in some the other day that I swear you could put your thumb in. Putting was useless.
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    #5
    As a golf course superintendent and one who causes aeration headaches for many, I
    believe everyone should take automatic two putts for about a week after aeration. If a course is aerating and not filling there holes with sand, there wasting there time. The benefit of filling the holes with sand is so great that all superintendents should be doing this. I can understand a superintendent putting a boat load of
    sand on em, but never understood taking the time to not
    put enough. If you really put a lot of
    sand on em and then broom it in so the holes are full, then fertilize em and not touch em
    with a mower for about five days, they generally grow through the sand and turn out pretty good after about a
    week. Generally, if you think there is too much sand on em, more than likely they will be smoother in a shorter amount of
    time. So cut your course some slack for that scenario, but dont cut em slack for lack of sand. Too little sand and they will be bumpy for a month

  7. Member haha's Avatar
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    #6
    Turfy, there is only one course I have played last year where I thought there was too much sand. The greens were 100% covered with sand to the point you could barely see grass. Just kind of weird.

    Back in the late 80's when I was working summer's at a private course we would aerate, broom sand, cut, then broom sand again. The whole crew would go one green at a time.
    The head greens keeper was old school as he was also old.
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by haha View Post
    Turfy, there is only one course I have played last year where I thought there was too much sand. The greens were 100% covered with sand to the point you could barely see grass. Just kind of weird.

    Back in the late 80's when I was working summer's at a private course we would aerate, broom sand, cut, then broom sand again. The whole crew would go one green at a time.
    The head greens keeper was old school as he was also old.
    Yea thats probably a little over the top. We try to
    put enough on them to get the holes filled with a couple
    passes of the drag broom. Then we follow and hand broom any areas that have a few holes not filled. Then we lightly blow them and mow em. Our golfers have been really happy with this method. Another thing we do, is we only do a few greens a week until they are all done. This way the golfer usually has about 15 good greens to putt on and only a few that they have to worry about aeration holes. This method doesnt mess up the entire course all
    at once.

  9. Member
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by turfy49431 View Post
    Yea thats probably a little over the top. We try to
    put enough on them to get the holes filled with a couple
    passes of the drag broom. Then we follow and hand broom any areas that have a few holes not filled. Then we lightly blow them and mow em. Our golfers have been really happy with this method. Another thing we do, is we only do a few greens a week until they are all done. This way the golfer usually has about 15 good greens to putt on and only a few that they have to worry about aeration holes. This method doesnt mess up the entire course all
    at once.
    Turfy - need some advice from an expert. At our little course/club in Southeast Missouri, we have insufficient funds to hire a superintendent, so about 10 of us retired guys are doing it all. It is only a nine hole course, but folks say it is in better shape now than it has been for several years. Our greens are 25 or so years old, bent grass. When we last aerated, we just punched holes, didn't pull plugs. Some of the old, old timers say we need to pull plugs, but the contractor who does our aeration says punching holes is all that is needed. What is your thoughts on this, and anyone's else's 2 cents worth. The greens are in very good shape, especially considering we had 3 months of 90 degree+ temps, plus high humidity. A lot of other courses in the area lost their greens or they were badly damaged. Thanks!

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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by RJR View Post
    Turfy - need some advice from an expert. At our little course/club in Southeast Missouri, we have insufficient funds to hire a superintendent, so about 10 of us retired guys are doing it all. It is only a nine hole course, but folks say it is in better shape now than it has been for several years. Our greens are 25 or so years old, bent grass. When we last aerated, we just punched holes, didn't pull plugs. Some of the old, old timers say we need to pull plugs, but the contractor who does our aeration says punching holes is all that is needed. What is your thoughts on this, and anyone's else's 2 cents worth. The greens are in very good shape, especially considering we had 3 months of 90 degree+ temps, plus high humidity. A lot of other courses in the area lost their greens or they were badly damaged. Thanks!
    If punching holes is all you can do, its better than nothing. Just make sure you fill the holes in next time. The advantage to actually pulling cores, is that your physically removing thatch and reducing the bulk density of the soil. Reducing the bulk
    density actually means reducing compaction. Solid tines still reduce compaction, just in lesser amounts and it doesnt remove any thatch. By filling the holes with sand they essentially become permanent rooting channels and areas for water to move through the soil and away from the surface. Your roots will go deeper in the rooting channels and it will also provide better oxygen/CO2 exchange. Its very important to get the water off the surface of the greens, especially where you live. If they are wet on top, disease will kill them very fast in the heat of the summer. You want the water where the roots are, not up in the thatch layer. Also if you have more than half inch of thatch, start topdressing more frequently to help dilute that thatch layer and firm up the surface a bit. They will putt smoother, more consistent, and be a little faster too. Bentgrass in the south is difficult animal for people that know
    what they are doing, y'all have your hands full. Feel
    free to contact me anytime. PM me if ya want my phone number. I love talking turf

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    #10
    thanks Turfy. We did fill the holes with sand. I may take you up on the phone talk next year!

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    #11
    When greens are aerated, I always use that time to focus more on my approach accuracy and depending on how close to the hole the ball is depends on if my group gives two or one put strokes. (Anything within 3-4' we normally just give one)

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    #12
    I am a 30+ year golf course superintendent as well. As far as using solid tines rather that coring tines, it depends a lot on how your greens are constructed. Yes, any hole is better than no hole, but if you have push-up greens I would highly recommend using coring, or even deep tine aerification. If they are USGA built greens or any mostly sand based, then there is no problem (IMHO) with using solids. I like to change it up, I'll use solids, then half inch coring, then 5/8 coring. Good luck!

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  14. Member haha's Avatar
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    #13
    Greens aerated in September (in my area)- if done right- are awesome to play on in late October and November. The nicest greens to putt on are fall greens in my opinion. When the weather gets cooler, football season starts you get limited play which means not many un-repaired ball marks.
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