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  1. #1
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    Setting up a Shadow Mod V 20' bass boat

    From Cajunmfg: first thing you need to do is call george,@hydrodynamics and have him build you a 12" rapid jack(they will sell and build it direct from the factory),the B2 model magnum(the B2 is designed for hulls that run no more than 2.5 under the pad,and up to 2" above,with roughly 4.5" vertical travel ,you see those 2 grab handles on the pass. side ? they have a purpose,we call 'em " holy chit" handles,the tunnel will ride like it's on rails,but in a hard turn it will literally eject you.,you have to trim down and get the bow up in a hard turn,3/4 trim is all you will ever use,start even with the pad and work her up,a cle or bob's cone is mandatory,mine is capable of mid 90's with a bridgeport.my buddy ran it to 92 and was dizzy,lol,,my hydrostream with a 280 was the same hull style,and handled likewise,it did 117mph,but unfortunately didn't have a livewell,,the new shadow being tested now,in SC, is running 113 with a 250 xs,and is the same hull with newer style topcap,and full deck extension,carbon fiber,under 500lbs,the same hull in std. 800lb. layup for the masses, is running 75 w/150 opti.you need the fastest trim system you can get.Once you learn how to drive you will see that they handle a chop just fine,all the ladies that diss the hull,likely haven't ever actually had one up on the pad flyin'. you should see low-mid 80's with a 200 setup right.,,,,,,,depends how heavy it is after your rebuild I'm not sure but in 1990 they became alot heavier when Jay stopped building them,your's is the identical color as mine,so,maybe it is a light leftover Tn. hull, titled as a '90,mine is around 800lbs.

    From rgsauger:
    Mid 90's!!! OMG!!!!! Well I am about 99% sure that mine was a later 89 boat as you suggested and is a light layup. The motor and trailer were 89's and they prob just called the boat a 90 to sell better. It is absolutely a light layup. When I stripped it all out, I added a second pair of knees on the transom (4 total now) to help tie it all together better. From the factory, there just wasn't a helluva lot there. All wood is marine grade Hydrotec, System 3 epoxy resin. I glassed the hell out of the transom & knees but was "judicious" elsewhere. The floor is 9mm, structural was 12mm. It should be within spittin' distance of factory from that regard.

    I stuck in group 29 batteries (probably should have done 27's) in the back - one on each side. So they are heavy (!!!) but nothing else really added from a weight standpoint. When I rebuilt it, I popped the top off (which was a real bitch because it is glassed from the inside, too), cut and ground out every inch of wood, replaced with marine grade and epoxy/glass, reinstalled the top and glassed it again from the inside. It is very unitized and solid.

    Yesterday, I had it up on top a little bit but still learning the boat and don't want to find myself in over my head, all of a sudden! I am pleased with how it rides, especially with some air under it. The ladies that gripe...well...they're just ladies!

    My prop is a 25p Merc Laser - 3 blade. I don't have a low water pickup yet. Whose do you suggest? As for the setback on the jack, my steering cables already don't like the current setback (dual cable, not hydraulic). Can you snap a pic or two of yours so I can see it?
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  2. Member
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    #2
    When I bought my Shadow, I drove about 300 miles to get it. When I got there, I found a rotten transom. The owner and I went back and forth a while and then I finally got it for what it was worth to me...let the work begin!

    Shadow's were built in TN/KY. The first step was to pop the top which was not easy as the boat is glassed from the inside, too. So, unscrewed the rub rail, drilled out all the 19,000 rivets, and then started separating the cap from the hull. This was done in a few ways.
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    The obvious way was to go around the perimeter with a utility knife and cut out the old clear silicone. Ok, that was easy enough. The real work was getting to all of the places from the inside that were never designed to be gotten too, again! I used a variable speed Rockwell Sonicrafter multi-tool from Lowes. The VS function was invaluable! Without this tool and a good shop vac, I could not have done this project. Period. No exceptions.

    Cutting from the inside was a real bitch. I was able to get to most of it with the Rockwell as seen below. Light cut line just above rivet holes:
    23.jpg

    Once I had cut everything that I could reach, the damn thing was still waaaaaaaay to tight to the bottom. So, I inserted a piece of 1/4" thick hard plastic (like Delrin or acetal) and started hammering it around the perimeter of the hull. This action was very productive as the fiberglass tabbing on the inside that had not been cut started to pull away on the inside. Finally, we were making progress!!!
    2 hammering piece of plastic around seam to split.jpg

    Once the exterior bond was completely broken, I then started to lift a little bit and found MORE bonds! Damnit! This thing was put together like a tank!!! As I would find another bond, out came the Sonic tool and straight blade...finally, I had the top lifted: I thought "SUCCESS AT LAST!!!" My enthusiam was exceeded only by my ignorance...the work had only just begun!
    10.jpg

    In this shot, you can see the tabbing near the bow that was ripped from the plastic piece. I could not get in there to cut this part. More to follow...

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    #3
    Check out the rotten transom! It was literally like mulch!!! I used a metal spachela (sp??) to scrape it out: 13.jpg 14.jpg 15.jpg 17.jpg Scary "chit" to think that this thing had a healthy 200HP Merc hanging on back!!! Oh God!!!
    Last edited by rgsauger; 02-19-2013 at 01:43 AM.

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    #4
    I keep raving on the Rockwell tool because it was just so dang helpful! My favorite blade is the straight, 1.5" wide, 14 tooth one. With this one, I was able to make scored cuts as well as plunge cuts. I was as surgical as possible when cutting apart the knees, stringers, etc so that I could use them as templates for the new ones.
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    #5
    More to come...got to do honey-do's for now...

  6. Member cajunrgfm's Avatar
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    #6
    yes,TN boat,good one,,,,,,,,,,boy that thang was bad,but the knees still looked pretty solid,didn't realize you had rack steering,mine has hydraulic,so lotsa hose to work with,you really had a tough time,I would have suggested that you just remove the rear top cap section ,they are definitely well stuck together,lol,,,,,,,you did a great job! I would like to see some of your finished work,before you replaced the cap,you see the small aluminum square over the lower motor bolt hole ?,those were factory,you should replace that with a thicker piece and use a transom saver strip on the top holes,especially if you get to the bigger j/plate,alot of weight hangin' 12-14" back.,,,,,,,Nice boat,just stick with the motor and jackplate you have and enjoy her for awhile,either find a cle lower unit,or have a bobs machine nosecone fitted onto your 200 case,then you can get that motor higher,for now,you best keep her at 3- 3.5" below pad,and work your way north,til you lose water pressure,once you have the low water p/ups,and you can get her just under or even with the pad,she will light yer butt,up,,lol,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,best bang for your buck now, is to get the LWP,then worry about jackplate,she will run well with a healthy ol' 200 , I've seen a guy on s n fly, claim 84mph with a rude 200,

  7. Member cajunrgfm's Avatar
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    #7
    actually,I read that you had a laser 2 prop,they run well on these things,but a big ear chopper,should be in your near future,after you are able to raise your motor a few inches. Keep up the good work,it's a fun boat !!

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    #8
    So...continuing on a bit on the destruction and resurrection of my Shadow...

    So the top came off after much ado which left the rest of the destruction for the hull:
    29.jpg

    I just realized that I didn't take many pics on the rest of the demo on this job...I guess too much sweat, itching, and maybe Bud lights too...so here is the hull when it was pretty much stripped...
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    I found that a combination of the Porter Cable random orbit sander and 36 grit paper and also a grinder with a very mean knotted abrasive wire brush were perfect for removing old glass and crap from the hull. I then started fitting the new transom wood. I used three layers of 1/2" marine grade Hydrotec plywood and System Three silver tip epoxy. Every inch of every piece of wood that went back in was coated with epoxy - fyi.
    37.jpg

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    #9
    The fitting of this piece was critical to the whole project. I temporarily secured the three pieces of wood together with 5 drilled holes and drywall screws. I would later epoxy these holes closed. Fitting these boards was a slow process requiring sanding, jig saw, planer, etc. to get everything just right. One I had the transom shaped, it would sit in the back of the boat perfectly. Then the rest of the process began. My Shadow came with two knees to tie the transom to the main stringers/hull. Too add even more strength, I increased this number to four knees. I found that the blue foam insulation board from Lowes was perfect for making templates. I would mark the piece as close as possible with pencil and then cut & trim it with a razor knife until it was exactly what I wanted. I then traced the foam part on the plywood and made the real one as shown:

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    Attached Images Attached Images

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    #10
    I made basically all of the fitted parts using the blue foam templates. I pretty much had a boat full of parts before I started epoxying or glassing:
    44.jpg

    I then started coating pieces in epoxy. I coated each board with epoxy and let it set overnight. I then built the 3-board transom assembly:
    45.jpg

    Assembly sitting for a day with weights and screws holding it together. Used epoxy thickened with cabosil between the boards. It is rock solid!!!
    46.jpg

    I then coated the remaining pieces with epoxy and started putting them together using "peanut butter" - epoxy thickened with wood flour. This stuff is like the hand of God when cured!!! I bedded the knees into the hull with it and then started bonding all the pieces together. The glass came next.
    47.jpg

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    #11
    This was my first time working with glass so cut me some slack if it's not perfect. I CAN say that I absolutely got better as I went along. The glass work toward the end was much neater!
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    Then came the front stringers and box:
    52.jpg

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    #12
    Next came the sections of floor at the rear and in the middle of the boat:

    59.jpg

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    64.jpg
    Last edited by rgsauger; 02-10-2013 at 08:13 PM.

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    #13
    Last edited by rgsauger; 02-10-2013 at 08:20 PM.

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    #14
    Once I had the top resting back on the hull, I used a pop rivet gun and 3/16" rivets (with washers on the back when I could round up help) to secure the two pieces. I initially riveted it about once every foot or so. I then got out the glass and resin and used glass tape on the inside of the joint to unitize the upper and lower together. After this glass had cured, I finished the riveting process using one rivet about every 5"-6". This "sumbitch" is NOT coming apart!

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    With the hull to deck joint glassed from the inside and riveted about every 5"-6", I then worked the outside of the joint in preparation fro installing the rub rail. There were several old holes that had not been used, etc., in the joint so I again mixed up some resin and thickened it with cabosil to the consistency of thick Elmer's glue. I took a 2" paint brush and painted the hole joint and the underside of it, forcing resin into any crevice or hole that I could find. This process further bonded the two halves into one assembly. with the last bit of resin, I thickened it just a bit more and filled the remaining depressions and holes as seen below. The thicken resin is sorta white and can be seen in the holes.

    100_4653.jpg
    Last edited by rgsauger; 02-10-2013 at 08:39 PM.

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    #15
    After two days of curing, I went over the outside of the joint and sanded any high points left by blobs of resin. I then installed the rub rail by aligning the rail and then drilling through the fiberglass before attaching it with stainless screws. These were run about every 5" also, between the rivets. This joint is SOLID!!!

    100_4654.jpg

    I then sealed the underside of the rub rail to the hull using 3M 5200. There's a reason why 5200 is called "permanent"!!! TIP!!! Wear laytex or other gloves when working with this stuff as it will NOT come off of your skin for about a week! Next, old clothes - if it won't come off your skin, it's NOT coming out of your clothes! And lastly, have plenty of acetone and paper towels handy for cleaning this stuff off of anything that you don't want it permanently on. If it's messy, just use an acetone soaked paper towel and it cleans right up. And don't forget plenty of ventilation - leads to one helluva headache the next day!

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    I still have to replace the carpet and strip clear coat that some rocket scientist sprayed on it years ago. It's a work in process but I can say that I have had it out twice and it runs GREAT!!! She's not the prettiest in the world (yet) but she's mine and she's paid for! I learned a ton in the process and will gladly share everything that I know with anyone who wants to know. I hope you enjoyed these posts. will continue them when I do the carpet.

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    Last edited by rgsauger; 02-10-2013 at 08:56 PM.

  16. Member cajunrgfm's Avatar
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    #16
    Wow Man !! you did a ton of work,Great job ! you made the thing like new,,were you able to access the whole perimeter of the cap to hull ,on the inside, to run your fiberglass bonding tape ??

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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by cajunrgfm View Post
    Wow Man !! you did a ton of work,Great job ! you made the thing like new,,were you able to access the whole perimeter of the cap to hull ,on the inside, to run your fiberglass bonding tape ??
    Thanks for the kind words. When I was posting the pics, I was like "damn, that was a helluva lot of work!" I kinda tend to forget the hard parts but the pics brought it all back. Glad to have that part behind me and be into the "tweaking it and making it mine" stage!

    I was able to get probably 60%-70% of the interior perimeter with the glass tape. It was a major mofo to glass it again from the inside but I tried my best to get as much as I could. Oozing/sqeegee'ing the thickened epoxy into the joint and through the holes probably did as much as anything on the joint. It was amazing how that thickened stuff set up to stiffen the joint. I would NOT want to ever break it back apart again. Honestly, I'm not sure if I could.

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    #18
    That was alot of work and better not dissing but looks better than factory!!!!!!ii use to have a friend here that loved them had 3 of them..but they all had problems.but i seen one the other day here that looked brand new red and black with yellow pins and mer if i see it again i'll try to run him down and get a pic.again awsome work!!!!!!

  19. Member mahan77's Avatar
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    #19
    looks like you did a heck of a job, those shadows are cool boats!
    Les Mahan - STROKER 250 MERC

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    #20
    Thanks guys. It really was a heckuva lot of work but it has been worth every minute of it. It runs great now and I will be dialing her in over the next few months. Hoping to break into the 80's with her. One thing that strikes me about her is how stable she is, both at speed and at rest - fishing. Given what I know now, i would still do it again.

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