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  1. #1
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    Good jig starting points, type and weight?

    Please donít think Iím asking for your go to jig. I am not expecting any answers along the likes of 1/2 ounce game city sledge head in Cumberland craw. I am looking for general starting head types and weight.

    I fish Cumberland and Green as a co angler. Do not own a boat yet. Iíve always gravitated towards using senkos and shakey heads. Lost confidence in the jig. Been using a common local brand 3/8 size in a small finesse skirt.

    Being in the back of the boat should I go heavier? Since the boater is usually ahead and by the time mine hits structure we are already pulling away etc.

    thanks!

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  3. Banned
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    #2
    You are on the right track. Going heavier will let you fish a little faster to keep up with boater. My favorite weight is 1/2 oz whether I’m in front or back. Sometimes the fish want a slower falling bait though. Just try and watch where the boater casts and hit the spots he misses.

  4. Member
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    #3
    1/2oz is a good all around size. A smaller compact trailer will give you a faster fall and a big bulkier trailer will obviously slow it down. Have someone take you out fun fishing and only take jigs and a selection of trailers. I prefer D&L jigs by the way. Good luck

  5. Member
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    #4
    3/8 & 1/2 oz. badboy jigs are what i use myself simply because they're a pretty good snag resistant head. I have several different molds that i make different styles of trailers with. Buy some in both weights to try, but 1/2 oz. with different styles of trailers to adjust for a different fall rate would be a good place to start. Usually something like the zoom swimmin chunk will get more hits, but in colder water a lot of times they want less movement & this is where something like the small zoom chunk usually works out pretty good. Craws are always popular as a jig trailer too. I have fished 3/4 ounce jigs to get deep quick & have good feel & it worked out pretty good, but i'm talking getting down to 50 to 60 or so feet in a hurry on Dale Hollow in summer.
    Last edited by Les Young; 01-04-2020 at 11:36 AM.

  6. Member
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    #5
    Do you use full size jigs or drop down to a finesse and/or baby version? I’ve always thrown the finesse size hoping for more bites.

  7. Banned
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    #6
    Size or bulk depends on water color for me. Honestly I don’t see a difference though. Caught many smallmouth on mop jigs in clear water.

  8. Member Stoner's Avatar
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    #7
    If you’re not an avid jig user try some bitsy bugs jigs from Wal mart 3/16oz and on that. I’m partial to the paca craw as a trailer and I nose hook it to get a freer action. I’ve caught a lot of fish on jigs but the bitsy bug is where it started. I wouldn’t go heavier just because your in the back seat. It would depend on the depth of the structure.
    Last edited by Stoner; 01-05-2020 at 08:24 AM.
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  9. Member
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    #8
    Another way to separate yourself from your boater is to throw a 3/8 to 1/2 oz (black/blue) swim jig with a good craw trailer at anything and everything that looks good. Its something different, and a lot of people still don't fish them for some reason. Plus they catch big fish. Look up Jason Christie's win at Dardanelle a few years back to get a general idea on how to fish one. Great video of him slaying them in some water willow.