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  1. #1
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    89 Stratos 285 problems

    I am having a number of problems with my 285 pro. I am new to bass boats so some of my questions may seem a little silly but here goes. Background of the boat. 1989 Stratos 285 pro with an 89 Evinrude 175xp with a 13.5x25 Shooter prop. With myself and my buddy in the boat I am able to achieve 5,000 rpms. I have never been able to do better then the 5,000. I am not worried about speed but I believe that the boat should perform better then that. The hole shot is terrible. The motor has been to a shop and had the compression checked and the motor is healthy.

    1. Shouldn't this motor turn about 5500 rpms?
    2. The hole shot is terrible.
    3. When running WOT the boat is very difficult to handle in turns. This may be my inexperience with a bass boat but it seems to want to slide through turns. I did have a scare with the boat one time where it actually turned extremely sharp and I almost was not able to straighten it out again.

    After reading so much about the motors sitting too low in the water I raised the motor on the boat one hole so that it is now in the second to hole from the bottom. The pin that stops the motor from trimming down all of the way is in the very bottom hole so that the motor sits at a negative angle with regards to the transom of the boat. The prop is sitting at 4" below the pad. Raising the motor did seem to help with the hole shot. I did notice that with the motor raised one bolt hole I am now getting a small rooster tail that I did not get before. Another thing I have noticed it that I can trim my motor very high and it does not cavitate. Any help that you guys can give me will be greatly appreciated. I am just not sure where to start i.e. jackplate, prop???

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  3. Member Jason Hale's Avatar
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    #2
    I had a 89 285, but had a 96 model 175 on it. However, I have run and set up many 285's over the years.

    With no jack plate, you are limited in set up. Mine ran best at 3-3.5" below. I ran a 24 Raker for best performance. Yes, you can set it up to turn 5500, but as you bring the motor up, the R's will/should come up as well.

    The shooter is not the best prop in the world. It's ok, but not the most efficient prop out there.

    You mention that you can trim the motor "very high" and it does not cavitate. When you are running 5000 RPM's are you trimmed as far up as it will go? If not, try that and see what happens.

    Jason Hale
    Product Manager
    Moeller Marine Products

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    #3
    The R's do come up to a point but as I said the seem to stay at the 5,000 mark I am not sure I understand what you mean by trimmed up all the way. I can trim the motor up more but I would say that I have to be darn close to the point where the trim stops and the trailering takes over. I am just not that familiar with a boat that needs the motor to be trimmed up that far. It seems to be too high. I will try it next time I am out on the river. Thanks for the help. I think that I will also try to find myself a 24 Raker.

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    #4
    The motor has 2 modes of motion in an angle; the system is called "trim and tilt". Trim is the first part of that range where the motor moves more slowly. As the speed of the angular motion increases, as you have noted you have gone into "tilt" mode. The engine is designed with an interlock such that the motor will not go into the tilt range above a certain RPM. Therefore, while running on the river at higher RPM, if you were to hold you finger constantly on the trim up button, the hydrualic system that trims/tilts the motor will stop when it reaches the full limit of "trim". You will not be able to make the motor go as high as you see it go when you are not on plane.

    Bass boats are high performance boats. They get a lot of their performance from the fact that a lot of the hull is lifted off the water (especially bow lift); this reduces drag as the boat moves easier in air with less water contact. Trimming the engine is part of a balance of forces to get the bow up. So, unless the prop starts blowing out (losing its bite) it is generally true that more trim can be better. If a rooster tail is no taller than the engine cowling, there is usually no issue. If it's higher, your prop is probably slipping (losing bite).

    When you say the prop is sitting 4 inches under the pad: Is that to the center of the prop shaft? Are the pad and the anti-cavitation plate parallel to one another when this measurement is made?

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    #5
    I have made sure that the pad and cavitation plate are both level prior to taking any measurements. I have now raised the motor to the last hole I have available until I add a jackplate. I am now at 3 5/8" prop to pad. I am looking around now for a prop but am not sure which way would be best to go i.e. a 3 blade that is 14.5" or a 4 blade that is 13.5 or 13.25. That will be the great dilemma now.

  7. Member
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    #6
    You won't be able to run it there without a jack plate because the prop will slip real bad. Find a 24" raker and get the motor down close to 4 1/4" under until you get a 6" plate. More than likely your tach is off and won't go above 5000. Don't worry about the diameter number just get a raker or a 23" renegade 4 blade
    Last edited by mdtritn21; 08-26-2013 at 10:23 AM.

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    #7
    I have seen the tach go above the 5,000 mark but I think that I am over propped. I have had numerous people tell me I should be running a 22P Raker or a 23P Renegade, with most of them recommending the Raker.

  9. Member
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    #8
    You have a shooter thats not a good prop to begin with. A 24 Raker or a 23" gade would be the two props I'd look at with a 6" plate.

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    #9
    I have to move at this a little slower then I want to or I will be looking for a divorce attorney instead of either. I think that I will start with the prop and at least get an improvement in the hole shot. I can say that my boat gets babied as I do am not a WOT type of guy. Thanks for your help and I will report back my findings.